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TUMBLR THEME BY AIUR MEDIA
"And let me speak to the yet unknowing world,
How these things came about..."

Tue-Sep-2014
980 notes
drawingarchitecture:
Léonor Mégrot-Desallais, 'Pavillons' (via)

drawingarchitecture:

Léonor Mégrot-Desallais, 'Pavillons' (via)

Tue-Sep-2014
400 notes

dirtyscarab:

Roku Kuroda

Queen of celipot & 処女解体-SHOJO KAITAI-

(via wingsfromspine)

Tue-Sep-2014
4,917 notes
Tue-Sep-2014
274 notes
thedemon-hauntedworld:
M94, Multi-ring galaxy M94 is a complex galaxy in Canes Venatici. It has both inner and outer rings surrounding an unusually bright and active core. The blue areas in the innermost ring are areas of intense star formation. In this image, the outer ring shows hints of the very faint spiral structure seen in recent professional images.
Credit: Bruce Waddington

thedemon-hauntedworld:

M94, Multi-ring galaxy
M94 is a complex galaxy in Canes Venatici. It has both inner and outer rings surrounding an unusually bright and active core. The blue areas in the innermost ring are areas of intense star formation. In this image, the outer ring shows hints of the very faint spiral structure seen in recent professional images.

Credit: Bruce Waddington

Tue-Sep-2014
82 notes

all-thats-interesting:

Gruesome, Vintage Medical Images From The National Library Of Medicine

Source: National Library Of Medicine

Tue-Sep-2014
161 notes
windypoplarsroom:
Hans Thoma
"September"

windypoplarsroom:

Hans Thoma

"September"

(via astranemus)

Tue-Sep-2014
52 notes
lawrenceleemagnuson:
Bryan Wynter (UK 1915-1975)Newlyn Harbour (1953)oil on fibre board 68 x 88 cm

lawrenceleemagnuson:

Bryan Wynter (UK 1915-1975)
Newlyn Harbour (1953)
oil on fibre board 68 x 88 cm

(via exites)

Wed-Aug-2014
408 notes

wapiti3:

Birds of La Plata, Argentina, by W. H. Hudson, on Flickr.

Coloured illustrations by H. Gronvold Publication info.
London [etc.]E.P. Dutton & Co.,1920.Contributing Library:.
University of California Libraries
B.H.L

(via scientificillustration)

Mon-Aug-2014
75 notes
logikblok-blog:
Saturn’s moons Rhea and Epimetheus transiting.
Saturn has a great many more moons than our planet – a whopping 62. A single moon, Titan, accounts for an overwhelming 96% of all the material orbiting the planet, with a group of six other smaller moons dominating the rest. The other 55 small satellites whizzing around Saturn make up the tiny remainder along with the gas giant’s famous rings.
One of the subjects of this Cassini image, Rhea, belongs to that group of dominating six. Set against a backdrop showing Saturn and its intricate system of icy rings, Rhea dominates the scene and dwarfs its tiny companion, one of the 55 small satellites known as Epimetheus.
Although they appear to be close to one another, this is a trick of perspective – this view was obtained when Cassini was some 1.2 million km from Rhea, and 1.6 million km from Epimetheus, meaning the moons themselves had a hefty separation of 400 000 km.
However, even if they were nearer to each other, Rhea would still loom large over Epimetheus: at 1528 km across and just under half the size of our own Moon, Rhea is well over 10 times the size of Epimetheus, which is a modest 113 km across.
 As is traditional for the earliest discovered moons of Saturn, both are named after figures from Greek mythology: the Titan Rhea (“mother of the gods”) and Prometheus’ brother Epimetheus (“after thinker” or “hindsight”).

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute, G. Ugarković
Read more about Cassini and it’s mission here. Logikblok.

logikblok-blog:

Saturn’s moons Rhea and Epimetheus transiting.

Saturn has a great many more moons than our planet – a whopping 62. A single moon, Titan, accounts for an overwhelming 96% of all the material orbiting the planet, with a group of six other smaller moons dominating the rest. The other 55 small satellites whizzing around Saturn make up the tiny remainder along with the gas giant’s famous rings.

One of the subjects of this Cassini image, Rhea, belongs to that group of dominating six. Set against a backdrop showing Saturn and its intricate system of icy rings, Rhea dominates the scene and dwarfs its tiny companion, one of the 55 small satellites known as Epimetheus.

Although they appear to be close to one another, this is a trick of perspective – this view was obtained when Cassini was some 1.2 million km from Rhea, and 1.6 million km from Epimetheus, meaning the moons themselves had a hefty separation of 400 000 km.

However, even if they were nearer to each other, Rhea would still loom large over Epimetheus: at 1528 km across and just under half the size of our own Moon, Rhea is well over 10 times the size of Epimetheus, which is a modest 113 km across.

 As is traditional for the earliest discovered moons of Saturn, both are named after figures from Greek mythology: the Titan Rhea (“mother of the gods”) and Prometheus’ brother Epimetheus (“after thinker” or “hindsight”).

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute, G. Ugarković

Read more about Cassini and it’s mission here. Logikblok.

Mon-Aug-2014
5,252 notes

nyctaeus:

Kevin Lucbert

(via exites)

Mon-Aug-2014
50 notes

(Source: vhslandscapes, via mustardcake)

Sun-Aug-2014
24,473 notes
Fri-Aug-2014
8,194 notes

linaliee:

Kobayashi Eitaku 

Body of a Courtesan in 9 stages of Decomposition, c. 1870.

(via wtfarthistory)

Fri-Aug-2014
142 notes

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Helix Nebula Hubble

The Helix Nebula, also known as The Helix, NGC 7293, is a large planetary nebula located in the constellation Aquarius.

Credit: NASA/Hubble

Thu-Aug-2014
2,290 notes
likeafieldmouse:
Marco Fusinato - Black Mass Implosion: (Mikrokosmos: Increasing – Diminishing, Bela Bartok) (2012)

likeafieldmouse:

Marco Fusinato - Black Mass Implosion: (Mikrokosmos: Increasing – Diminishing, Bela Bartok) (2012)